REVIEW. Neural correlates of second language word learning: minimal instruction produces rapid change

The study Neural correlates of second language word learning: minimal instruction produces rapid change (McLaughin, Osterhout & Kim 2004) attempts to identify how much exposure to a Second Language (L2) is needed before the brain activity reflects the lexical status and meaning of L2 words. As an overarching goal, the authors want to dispel one of the Second Language Development (SLD) myths, namely that L2 Learning is slower and harder than L1 acquisition. Correlating Event Related Potentials (ERPs) with hours of instruction, they found that L2 learners acquire linguistic information about L2 word forms with “remarkable speed” (704), contributing to the current literature against the Critical Age Hypothesis… Continue reading here

Leave a Reply